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Rwanda 2012, Part Two

December 10, 2012

Well it’s up early and breakfast at the Hotel, a meeting of the team to review the schedule. Pastor Somon arrives with his SUV and a small van to transport us to the Job site. City streets in Gisenyi were terrible, with dirt roads and rocks sticking up in the road everywhere. It’s hard to believe cars can last very long going over these roads. We arrive at the Child Development Center (CDC) in about a half hour.

Chilld Development Center and Medical Clinic

Child Development Center and Medical Clinic

We could not believe some of the loads of merchandize that some of the local people carried on their bicycles on the way to the market place to sell their goods.

Hauling their goods to market

Hauling their goods to market

Our first stop is at the medical clinic. This clinic is there to support the orphans and their families. There is not an orphanage there but a village where the people have taken in orphans to live with them as part of their family. In doing this they get support, medical care, opportunities for learning a trade as well as food from the CDC gardens.

We are met by a group of children from the village who all wanted to hold our hands and be close to us.

The medical clinic in the background and our welcoming committee greeting us

The medical clinic in the background and our welcoming committee greeting us

From the clinic we walked to the school where the chapel was being built. We felt like celebrities as we were surrounded by the local children who wanted to hold out hands as we walked. They were also fascinated by our body hair. For those of us that had hairy arms we were constantly be rubbed because none of the local people have body hair like many of us do.

Walking to the job site with our junior escort's

Walking to the job site with our junior escort’s

The first thing we did was tour the school. This school is set up to give local people occupational skills so they can earn a living and support their families. The school had classes in African art, sewing, auto mechanics, welding, construction, block laying, and carpentry. They also take paying students from outside the village to help support the project. Some of the team members from Prince Edward Island, Canada had been here in 2009 and helped build the school.

The trade school

The trade school

After a tour and explanation about the school we spent time on the job site. The Chapel that we were to help build had the foundation done, cement pillars and some of the roof structure completed.

Our work project, a Chapel of the village

Our work project, a Chapel for the village

Our first task is to transport cement blocks from the front of the chapel site to the back so they could start laying the back wall. We formed a human chain to move the blocks with help from the local volunteers.

Moving the cement blocks

Moving the cement blocks

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Part of the human chain

All of the cement blocks were made on site one at a time. The students and volunteers were doing the block laying. There was another group working on building roof trusses from square tubing, cutting to length and welding it together. The welder was made by the students from old wire and worked amazingly well. This shows the genus needed when you have limited resources to get the job done.

Making cement blocks one at a time

Making cement blocks one at a time

The welder

The welder

We worked until after noon and then went to the Pastors house for lunch. We had a big surprise when we returned which reminded us who was in charge. God tells Jeremiah in chapter 29:11 “For I know the plans I have for you”  and we were to find out His plans later that day.

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