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Haiti 2010 #2, Day 2

October 25, 2010

It’s up at four AM so we can eat and load the rest of our stuff on the trucks for the trip to Blecke. We were on the road by seven-thirty for the five-hour ride up the mountains. As we leave the city of Port Au Prince we see many tent cities where people are crowded in a small area living in tents because their houses were destroyed by the earthquake.

One of many tent cities

We pass many areas were there are street markets where people are working hard to make a living in a city were there are few jobs to be had.

Making a living as best you can

Once out of the city we turn up a dirt road which leads us to the mountains. The road becomes narrow and winds up the mountain side. In May there was a medical team with both Americans and Haitians going up this road to host a medical clinic when one of the vehicles slipped off the side of the mountain road and rolled down into a valley. One of the Haitian doctors was killed and others injured. There are several places were there is no room for passing oncoming vehicles.

Up the mountain road

Then it is down into a valley where we follow a river bed for several miles and then we cross the river and it’s up the mountains on the other side.

The River Crossing

We all find Haiti the be a beautiful country full of rivers, mountains and valleys. There are flowers growing along the roads and scenic views everywhere. If it were not for the lack of facilities and infrastructure this would be an ideal tourist destination.

A View From the Top

We met the Nazarene District Superintendent in Port Au Prince and he rode in one of our trucks to Blecke. He has offered us a place to sleep and eat in his house for the time we will be working on our church building project. The house is about 30 minutes from the Church Building Site.

Our Home for the Trip

 We unload all of the luggage and food supplies for out trip and head for the Church site in Blecke. This Nazarene congregation had a church near a river close to here. In 2004 there was a storm with a lot of rain and the church was washed away when the river flooded. There were many homes lost and several lives lost at the time. The congregation started meeting under a tree for the first year after the church building was lost. They also began praying for a new church which they could not afford. They found a temporary place to meet and for the next five years they prayed for a new church. After many requests by the District Superintendent the Nazarene Church offered to help build a church after the congregation came up with a new site to build and could furnish the water and sand for concrete. Through work and donations they acquired the land on higher ground and the other things needed to start the  building. A crew from Port Au Prince was contracted to do the cement work. The Work and Witness Workshop at the college build steel roof trusses and the material for the rest of the church was purchased. When we arrived it was our job to put a roof on the church, paint it inside and out and assemble the benches for the church.

Church Building with no Roof

We started with three groups, one putting us roof trusses, one painting the building and the last one assembling benches.

Some of the painters

Some of the Villagers and our Team Assembling Benches

Putting up Trusses

By the end of the day we had many of the trusses up and some of the stringers on top of the trusses. Many of the benches were assembled and a good portion of the outside of the church was painted. We were all tired and welcomed a good meal back at the house. Tomorrow the medical team would break off and open a clinic for the local people in need of medical help. The more people we meet here in Haiti it is easy to see God is at work here.

“God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you helped his people and continue to help them.” Hebrews 6:10

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